Now Published Online as e-books!

Massa’s White Supremacist Discourse of West Indian Negro Slavery Deconstructed Volume 2 has been published online as an e-book. This work is a deconstruction of the works of four white supremacists who wrote on the nature of slave societies of Jamaica and the British colonies of the Eastern Caribbean from the late eighteenth century to the 1830s, the threats posed to white hegemony and the strategy to deal with said threats. These authors are: Bryan Edwards foremost discursive agent of white supremacy in the British West Indies who formulated a hegemonic discourse of white supremacy in the British West Indies and led an assault on the abolitionists in the House of Commons of Britain noted for its potency by the abolitionists. Bryan Edwards’ discourse of West Indian white supremacy is potently instructive of the discursive basis of this white discourse revealing the congenital failure especially since independence to deconstruct this discourse thereby silencing the neo-colonial versions that now circulate as fact. Frederic William Naylor Bayley is steeped in Edwards’ discourse of West Indian white supremacy and his work is devoted to proving that the enslaved Africans are not fit for freedom. There must then be a prolonged period of enslavement which will prepare the enslaved for freedom as there is now in the British Eastern Caribbean colonies an ameliorated slavery, an evolved slavery under the rule of law and progressive, modern massas which will prepare the enslaved for freedom at some point in time in the future. Benjamin McMahon is a white supremacist abolitionist who destroys the myth that there was an ameliorated slavery in Jamaica from the abolition of the slave trade to the abolition of slavery. McMahon presents in graphic detail the daily, barbaric operational reality of African enslavement in Jamaica in the early nineteenth century and insights into the evolution of white supremacy in Jamaica. The final author is Mary Nugent wife of the Lieutenant-Governor of Jamaica who was resident in Jamaica from 1801 to 1805. Nugent’s discourse of the blackies presents a Christian discourse of the necessity of African enslavement whilst she gives potent insights into British colonial rule and the nature of the social order. Nugent rails against the threat posed by the Haitian Revolution to white supremacy in Jamaica placing this epochal event of African liberation in the context of the reaction by a female white supremacist. The abiding lesson of this text is the potent failure of neo-colonial discourse to grapple with and articulate the reality of West Indian white supremacist discourse as the discourse is servile in the 21st century to massa ‘s discourse of white supremacy seen in the myths and lies it peddles as fact and history.

Frantz Fanon for the 21st century volume 3 is now published online as e-book. This is a deconstruction of the writings of Fanon on the Algerian Revolution in a search for insights into the failure and collapse of this revolution in spite of all that Fanon wrote. What is revealed is Fanon’s discourse of revolution being in a state of transition at the time of his death where he was questioning the concepts of revolution he borrowed from western discourse in a search for insights to create a new discourse of revolution applicable to the colonial and neo-colonial world. The grave stress revealed in Fanon’s discourse of revolution in Algeria is the place and position of Islamic discourse in the mechanics of this revolution and Fanon grappling with this reality reveals all the contradictions of being non-white and revolutionary yet defining your world through white discourse. The collapse of the Algerian revolution indicates potently that white ideas of revolution inevitable lead to neo-colonial domination premised on oligarchic rule over the revolution. Did Fanon see flashes of this collapse before the expulsion of the French colonizer was finalized?

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